Where Ipswich Town stand in the all-time Premier League spending list

PUBLISHED: 06:00 01 August 2020

Ipswich Town manager George Burley spent big money on Hermann Hreidarsson and Matteo Sereni during the Premier League years. Picture: PA

Ipswich Town manager George Burley spent big money on Hermann Hreidarsson and Matteo Sereni during the Premier League years. Picture: PA

Archant

Ipswich Town spent £81million on transfer fees and wages during their years in the Premier League, according to a leading football finance expert.

Those figures come from Kieran Maguire, a lecturer in Football Finance in Liverpool and a published author on the subject, who has charted clubs’ spending since the Premier League began in 1992.

The figures show a total £47.4billion has been spent by the 49 clubs who have competed in the top flight since it was rebranded, with Ipswich’s total of £81m leaving them ranked 42nd. Only Nottingham Forest, Sheffield United, Bradford City, Blackpool, Barnsley Oldham and Swindon have spent less than the Blues.

You may also want to watch:

By contrast, Town’s rivals Norwich have spent £350million with the Canaries spending more seasons in the top flight and having three stints in the league since the explosion of television money.

MORE: Ipswich Town’s stance on salary cap proposals outlined by O’Neill

Ipswich’s five seasons in the Premier League saw them play the first three following the launch, before a two-season return from 2000 to 2002. The Blues broke their transfer record in each of their two summers as a Premier League side, firstly signing Hermann Hreidarsson for £4.5million from Wimbledon before topping that with the capture of Matteo Sereni (£4.7million) a year later. The Italian was earning in excess of £20,000 a week, representing a high point in the club’s wage-paying ability.

Topping the table are Chelsea on more than £5billion, largely since Roman Abramovich bought the club, ahead of Manchester United (£4.7billion) and relative newcomers to the top table Manchester City (£4.3billion).

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Green Un